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MEMORIAE CAUSA 



CLASS BOOK 
1931 

(iHassaclTusctts 

AIM HIGH 



We, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and 
Thirty-one, respectfully dedicate our Class 
Book to our advisers. Miss McDermott and 
Mr. Piper, in sincere and grateful apprecia- 
tion of their services. 



s t 



"^HIS is the beautiful classic of architecture which has become immeasur- 
ably dear to our hearts through familiar association. It is fittingly 
named after the beneficent gentleman who presented it to the townspeople. 
We have indeed received inspiration from surroundings of such stately 
serenity. It has come to mean more to us than a mere structure; it has 
come to represent a phase of our lives which we are now leaving; it is sur- 
rounded with a haze of pleasant memories. We pass its traditions to those 
who come after us. May they cherish them as we do. 



Leighton S. Thompson Amherst A. B., Harvard Ed. M. 




Principal 


Dorothea T. Allen 


Smith A. B. 




English 


John A. Bagnell 


Colby B. S. 




Mathematics, Science 


Chester A. Brown 


Colby B. S. 




Science 


Agnes V. Dugan 


Boston University 




Commercial 


Clarence A. Elwell Bates A. B. 




Latin 


Mary C. Gavitte 


Syracuse B. A. 




English 


Martha D. Lange 


Radcliffe A. B., Harvard Ed. M. 




English, German 


DoRicE M. Lord 


Smith B. A. 




French 


Ethel E. Lord 


Boston University B. A. 




Commercial 


Carrie M. Lyman 


Boston University B. S. 




Mathematics 


Margaret E. McDermott Boston University B. A. 




French, Latin 


Milton A. Noble 


Tufts B. S. 




Economics, History 


Francis K. Piper 


Tufts B. A. 




. Science 


Helen S. Southworth Boston University B. S. 




H istory 


Bernice E. Staples 


Mass. School of Art 




Drawing 


Marion E. Watkins 


Smith A. B. 




English 


Hazel Whitehead 


Boston University 




Commercial 


Ruth E. Wright 


University of New Hampshire A. B. 




French, History 




N our recollections of high school years we will always remember our 
faculty with respect as instructors, with gratitude as helpers, with fond- 
ness as friends. We sincerely hope that they will be able to whole-heartedly 
reciprocate our earnest appreciation and esteem. We have indeed been 
fortunate in having a faculty whose standards are high and of whom we 
are justly proud. 





Class (Bht 



There's a mountain in the distance 
With its peak against the sky. 
And its luring beauty beckons 
Eager pilgrims passing by. 

We must climb that mountain, classmates; 
We must choose our paths and go. 
Each one on his way, advancing 
With a steadfast aim and slow. 

When the goal is reached, my classmates, 
And we hear the words, "Well done," 
We will know the journey's ended 
For the class of thirty-one. 

— Bernice J. Whitehead 
(Music by Philip Cook and Rudolph Heider) 



Class ^Jom 



We are Seniors who are climbing 
Upward till we reach our goal; 
Hoping as we strive for vict'ry, 
That we all may fill our role. 

Now we stand upon the threshold 
Of our dear, beloved school. 
Thinking of the years before us, 
When we may apply our rule. 

As we face with fear the future, 

Far beyond the sheltering walls. 

May we staunchly meet life's problems 

As we answer to her calls. 



— James Parr 



EDWARD WILLIAM BROLDER 
"ted'" 

President .>. 1 Football l^. 4 

Vice-President L 2 Baseball 3, 4 

Lieut. Cadet Corps Traffic Squad 4 

Asst. Editor Blue and While 3 

Editor Blue and While 4 
Junior Play Various Committees 

Folks, meet "Ted", our able president 
and a fine fellow. "Ted's" achievements 
have covered practically every activitv in 
school. Just take a glance above at some 
of his accomplishments. Anyone would 
be proud of a record like that. "Ted's" 
popularity is tremendous. Maybe his 
school spirit and loyalty are responsible 
for this. Altogether he has made an ideal 
class leader. We sincerelv wish vou all 
the good things of life. "Ted''. 



CHARLES AVERILL 
"charlie" 

Valedictorian Captain Cadet Corps 

Chairman Book Committee Treasurer 2 
Junior Play Student Council 2. 3, 4 

Manager Track 4 Vice-President 4 

Humor Editor Blue and White 2, 4 
Asst. Business Manager Blue and White 3 
Traffic Squad 4 Various Committees 

My name is Charles, but to you it's 
"Charlie". It's rather difficult to delineate 
a pleasing portrait of one's self, don't you 
think? However, if my classmates have 
enjoyed my company as much as I have 
appreciated their friendship, my high 
school days will be a happy remembrance. 
I hope that my facetious outbreaks will be 
forgiven and my humble efforts will be 
rightly interpreted. After all, 1 mean 
well, you know! 





PETER JESSEL 
"pete" 

Lieut Cadet Corps Football 4 

Treasurer 3 Secretary 4 

Traffic Squad 4 

"Pete" is famed for his modesty. For 
this reason he has endeared himself to us 
all the more. "Pete" certainly is a good 
sport. How he fought for his dear old 
alma mater w hen he carried that big num- 
ber 10 on his football jersey! "Pete" 
wasn't exactly what we would call an ama- 
teur with the ladies, either. 



JOHi\ BRAMLEV TORDOFF 
"johnny" 

Treasurer 4 Class Will 

Various Committees 
We have yet to see "Johnny" without his 
pleasing grin. Good-humored "Johnny" 
is quite as ready to take a joke as spring a 
few'. His popularity has grown steadily 
throughout his high school career. He has 
done many services for his classmates as 
treasurer. We hope you will always be 
carefree, "Johimv". 




15 




ROSEMARY ALLATT 
"rose" 

Whenever you want to forget your cares 
and troubles, just call on "Rose"! Although 
she is a demure and shy little miss, she 
blossoms forth brilliantly when you en- 
gage her in conversation. We wish you 
a successful career, "Rose"! 



STANLEY ELMORE ANDERSON 
"sandy" 

"Sandy" professes to be somewhat of a 
sheik and we certainly concede him to be 
an all-round good sport. He has always 
presented a neat, well-dressed appearance 
in high school. We've enjoyed your com- 
pany immensely, Stanley, and we wish you 
good luck in your chosen profession. 





RUTH ELIZABETH ARCHIBALD 



"Ruthie" is famed as a party girl. Her 
reputation as a good sport and congenial 
companion is widespread. Ruth has been 
present at all our parties and socials; we 
have grown to expect her cheery greeting. 
However, at present she has carried her 
affairs of the heart to our neighboring 
community of Lawrence. Why don't you 
behave, Ruth? 



16 



WILLIAM ARTHUR ATKINSON 

"billy" "wucky" 
Basketball 2, 3, Capt. 1 Football 4 

Lieut. Cadet Corps Traffic Squad 4 

This is our own Wesley Barry! How 
many times has "Billy" p;iven us a thrill 
with his snap and speed on the basketball 
floor. You would p;o far to find as popu- 
lar a boy as this beloved red-head. He is 
liked by everyone. From that grin of his 
"Billy" leads a happy existence. Bon 
voyage, "Billy"! 





JENNIE EUNICE BAKER 
Hockey 2, .3, 4 Basketball 2, 3, 4 

Various Committees 

Jennie was an outstanding bright light 
in our athletic and social life. Jennie has 
corralled six letters during her high 
school career — one for each of the boy 
friends, eh, Jennie? She was unsur- 
passed as a cheer leader. We know you'll 
go big in business, Jennie. 



GERTRUDE LOUISE BEAUMONT 
"certie" 

"Gertie" is a cute little miss with a per- 
sonality all her own. "Gertie" is one of 
the reasons why the traffic officers can't 
keep their minds on duty and single file. 
We consider ourselves fortunate in having 
"Gertie" to grace our humble school. No 
kidding, "Gertie", we couldn't get along 
without you! 




17 



"^4 




GARABED YEGHIA BEDROSIAN 

"GARY" 

Although we have not had "Gary" with 
us for all the four years of our high 
school, we've had him here long enough to 
find out his excellent work in drawing. 
We are sure that you will be successful in 
the field of art, "Gary ', if you continue 
as you have done in the past. You will 
be, if good wishes avail anything! 



MARION LOUISE BEVERLEY 

Marion is a lovable girl who fairly 
i)ubbles over with fun and good humor. 
You just can't get her angry or make her 
lose her sunny smile. We really believe 
that "Sunshine" should be Marion's mid- 
dle name. Keep smiling. Marion! 





LEAH MILDRED BIBBINS 
"sugar" 

\ arious Committees Basketball 4 

Leah is the cute little baby girl of our 
class. She has achieved the nickname of 
"Sugar". Leah has been one of our faith- 
ful tax collectors. She has made it a 
pleasure to pay dues. Leah has been a 
conscientious student, too, and has ranked 
high among the leaders. Keep going, 
Leah! 




18 



^4 



ANNE BISTANY 

Anne is one of the quieter menxbers of 
our class. She has participated in chorus 
work and has applied herself diligently to 
her studies. Her honest efforts in school 
work have produced results. We are sure 
that you will succeed, Anne. 






ROBERT GEORGE BROIIDER 
"bob" 

"Silence is golden" seems to be one of 
"Bob's" axioms. He doesn't waste any 
energy saying things that aren't worth- 
while. Always cheerful, "Bob" seems to 
enjoy his school work. He has always 
gained creditable marks. It would be 
hard to forget an industrious fellow like 
you, "Bob". 



THELMA GRACE BUDU 
Hockey 4 

Thelma is a girl who loves to oblige. 
Many nights Thelma has burned the mid- 
night oil assisting prominent football 
players to avoid the red menace; and they 
all seem to enjoy their tutor. Who knows 
how many games Thelma has saved for 
Methuen. Keep up that team work, 
Thelma. 



19 





WILLIAM LOUIS BUDD 
"billy" "buddy" 
Aide Cadet Corps Football 3, 4 

Picture Committee Various Committees 
Traffic Squad 4 Junior Play 

Orchestra 2, 3 

"Buddy" stands out for his heljifulness; 
if you get in a "jam", call on "Buddy"! 
He was quite a football man, and held the 
position of Aide in the Cadet Corps. Our 
class would be at a loss to replace such a 
willing worker. We will always remember 
him as a friend in deed as well as in word. 
It is quite true that he is "alwavs a Buddy". 



CLIFFORD CHARLES BURBY 
"cliff" 

Football 3 Adjutant Cadet Corps 

Baseball 3 Traffic Squad 4 

Book Committee \arious Committees 

Have you ever seen that Burby boy step? 
He's some dancer! He certainly can burn 
up the floor. His classmate? have voted 
him the most sociable boy. Cliff has dis- 
tinguished himself on the diamond and 
gridiron. We mustn't forget that he was 
our big adjutant, too. We wish you good 
luck in art school, "Cliff". 





STANLEY MATTHEW CEBULA 
"sheik" "ceb" 
Capt. Cadet Corps Football 2, 3. 4 

Track 4 Baseball 3 

Traffic Squad 1 

The ideal athlete and heart breaker per- 
sonified! You know, annually "Sheik" 
goes on strike and becomes a bachelor; 
and it takes courage to do that during the 
football season: ask "Sheik", he knows! 
But we don't mean that "Ceb" neglects his 
work; he is one of the most industrious 
students in the class. Don't let the girls 
worry you, "Sheik"! 



re. 



20 




MARION RITA CHATEAUNEUF 
Manager Hockey 4 

If you see four feet nine inches of fun 
walking up the street you'll know it's 
Marion. Marion proves the saying that 
"good things come in small packages." If 
you don't get acquainted with Marion, 
you're missing a treat. 




JAMf:S HENRY CLIFFORD 
"jimmie" 

Football 3, 4 Track 3 

Captain Cadet Corps Various Committees 

"Jimmy" is our John Gili)ert. Don't 
you think so, girls? He's quite a man at 
any party. "Jimmy" is an ambitious and 
versatile athlete, too. He attempts all our 
sports except girls' basketball. "Jimmy" 
is a great sheik; the boy is a mighty so- 
cial lion. Don't weaken, "Jimmy"! 



BEATRICE COHEN 

"bee" 

"Bee" is a quiet girl who, however, 
seems to enjoy herself at our dances and 
parties. She has made many firm friend- 
ships among her classmates. If we are to 
believe her friends, we see her mostly in 
second speed, for she steps out quite often. 
Good luck, "Bee"! 




21 



.o1 




ESTER LEA COHEN 

Ester went out for athletics with deter- 
mination. She was a member of both class 
basketball, and class hockey teams and 
ably assisted in their victories. She always 
manages to appear cheerful and happy no 
matter how things go. and that's a pretty 
hard thing to do. Aim high, Ester! 



PHILIP CLOUGH COOK 
"phil" "cookie" 
Lieut. Cadet Corps Traffic Squad 4 

Have you heard the latest story? Ask 
Phil, he's a regular walking joke book. 
"Phil" is a hardw orking young man whose 
good humor has made him a place in the 
hearts of all. We wish you success in 
every enterprise you undertake, "Phil". 





EVERETT DALE COOKSON 
Basketball 4 Orchestra 2 

Everett blossomed out on the basketball 
team in his Senior year. He has always 
done his part to make our affairs a success. 
He is rather a quiet and retiring boy. but 
he has made many firm friends among his 
classmates. You have made a good start 
in school, Everett. Stick to it. 



22 



TELVINA TERESA CRAWLIN 

Telvina is an exceedingly demure and 
modest girl. She has always endeavored 
to do her best in the pursuit of her courses, 
and she's always a welcome sight bringing 
around the notices. Don't be too bashful, 
Telvina! 





HELEN GARE CURRIE 
Hockey 3, Capt. 4 Manager Basketball 4 
Athletic Editor Blue and White 4 

Various Committees 

Come on, gang, let's give a big cheer for 
our Helen. We take off our hats to you, 
Helen, for what you've done for our 
school. You make a swell little cheer 
leader, an able hockey captain, and a 
great sport! They'll have a hard job to 
fill your place next year. Let the boys do 
their studying at business school, Helen! 



FLORENCE EVELYN DANE 
"danie" 

Social Editor Blue and White 4 

Hockey 3, 4 Class Prophetess 

Basketball 4 Various Committees 

"Danie" is one of our class "cuties". 
She is one of the reasons why the boys 
neglect their studying. The statue of 
Lincoln has been known to smile as 
"Danie" passed by. Even the slave rises 
to doff his hat! She's among the foremost 
of our social butterflies, and an essential 
on the basketball team. Happv days, 
"Danie"! 




?3 



1 




GEORGE ARTHUR DAWSON 
"georgie" 

Class Prophet Manajjer Football 4 

Baseball 2, 3, 4 i>ieiit. Cadet Corps 

Various Committees Picture Committee 
Class Wit 

George is one of those rare people, a 
natural wit. His spontaneous, sparkling 
humor and genuine good-nature have made 
for him countless friends in high school. 
He certainly helped liven up the Blue and 
Wliitel George has been prominent in ath- 
letics — a veteran on the baseball team and 
manager of football. Who will make the 
leap and save the fair damsel, George? 



WAITKR LINCOLN DAVIS 

\\ alter has a line ideal to aim at in that 
middle name of his. Well, you know, 
"aim high"'. Walter. But don't try any 
rail-splitting just vet! Walter's diminu- 
tive si/.e has caused him to l)e considered 
one of our babv i)ovs. Don t forget. Rome 
wasnl built in a dav. Walter. 





MURIEL FRANCES DEAN 

Although youre very quiet, Muriel, 
don't think for a minute we don't notice 
and appreciate vour modest and likeable 
personality. Muriel has been voted our 
class quietest. This is a distinction amid 
the general trend toward noise. We wish 
you success in everv way, Muriel. 



24 



EMMA MARY DE FELICE 

Emma appears to be a very sociable girl. 
She has made a name for herself in the 
commercial department of the school. Her 
assistance about the office has been of great 
value. Maybe you'll be stenographer to a 
President, Emma. 





GLADYS DEPOIAN 

"giogle.s" 

It would be a terrible catastrophe indeed 
if Gladys lost her contagious giggle. It 
has caused a commotion in more than one 
class! Gladys is a fun-loving girl who 
has a ready smile and a friendly greeting 
for everyone. \'ou know, "Laugh and the 
world laughs with you", Gladys. 



MARY DOLAN 

Mary is noted for her infectious giggle. 
Mary can well laugh with satisfaction, for 
her scholastic attainments have been far 
above the average. Mary has shown an 
aptitude for such subjects as chemistry, 
showing the other girls that it can be done. 
This school needs more like you, Mary. 




25 




JAMES THOMAS DUNN, Jr. 
"jimmy" 

Junior Play Ivy Orator 

Business Manager Blue and White 4 
Manager Basketball 4 Traffic Squad 2, 4 
Q. M. Cadet Corps Various Committees 
"Jimmy's" many activities speak for 
themselves. His work on the Blue and 
White and as quartermaster of the cadets 
deserves great praise. He also performed 
creditably in the Junior Play and at our 
class parties. We ought to be especially 
grateful to "Jimmy" for his cheerful work 
in soliciting advertising for the class book. 
"Jimmy", we all say a sincere "thank you." 



ELIZABETH MARY DOYLE 

When Elizabeth left Lawrence, they cer- 
tainly lost a fine little girl. She graced 
our class teams both in girls' basketball 
and field hockey. Who's the young fellow 
who accompanies you home after school? 
Don't be holding out on us! 





SHIRLEY MARIE EICHHORN 
"shirl" 

Hockey 3, 4 Basketball 4 

Class Will Various Committees 

Shirley, it's hard to express how much 
your classmates admire your charming per- 
sonality. Shirley has been elected our 
most sociable girl. Such popularity must 
be deserved, "Shirl". You've been a ray 
of sunshine throughout our classrooms, 
and have brightened many a dreary day. 
Keep a song in your heart, Shirley! 



re". 



k 



t 



EVELYN GERTRUDE ELLIS 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4 

Evelyn is one of the quieter members of 
our class, but she sure has a great many 
friends. Evelyn played the violin in our 
school orchestra for the four years of high 
school and she has proved to be a talented 
musician. You'll make a concert artist 
some day, Evelyn. 





PHYLLIS MAE EYERS 

Phyllis's smile is her trademark, and an 
excellent one at that. She is a firm fol- 
lower of school athletics and has centered 
much attention on her studies. May you 
add many friends to those you have made 
at Methuen High School, Phyllis. 



MILDRED CATHARINE PAGAN 
"millie" 
Junior Play 

"Millie" was the belle of the Military 
Ball you know, while the rest of the girls 
had to be satisfied to sit back and be the 
tinkle. She also is our Best Dressed Girl, 
which wasn't a hard problem to solve. With 
those eyes and that personality, "Millie", 
no wonder you have captured the male half 
of the school — but then, the girls are not 
slow to shout your praises either. 



37 




PHYLLIS AGNES FASULLO 
"fifi" 

Hockey 4 Basketball 4 

Exchange Editor Blue arid W hile 4 

Various Committees 

"Fifi" is a member of the unholy three 
— Gertie. Danie. Fifi. She has been verv 
ac'ive in basketball and hockey. She has 
taken part in all our social affairs with 
fine school spirit. She has done good work 
as Exchange Editor of our Blue and White. 
Your services will never be forgotten by 
the class of '31, "Fifi". 



RUTH HELEN FEINDEL 

Quiet Ruth! We admire your reserved 
manner. We feel that you will be most 
efficient in your chosen career. Ruth tends 
more to the old-fashioned type, which 
holds everyone's sincere respect. Here's 
wishins you the greatest success. Ruth ! 




RICHARD BRUCE FIEDLER 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4 

Bruce has many sterling qualities. He 
is a splendid musician, possesses a fine 
voice, and has a clear, quick mind. He 
has a sunny disposition and is full of am- 
bition and pep. Bruce and his trumpet 
have entertained us many times. We hope 
to hear of many of your future triumphs 
as a musician, Bruce. 



28 




MARGARET MIRIAM GANEM 

Margaret may be considered quiet by 
some, hut her m.any friends know her for 
her charming ways and her gig'3;Ies. It 
sure would be quiet at lunch period with- 
out Margaret. We're sure the business 
world will be quick to appreciate you, 
Margaret. 





LILY VINCENT GRENVILLE 
Orchestra 2 

Lily, you'll always be remembered for 
your sweet and sunny disposition. You've 
often set our feet tapping with your piano 
playing. Lily is one of the few who have 
managed to keep their college courses com- 
plete for the four years. We bet you won't 
forget Virgil and chemistry, Lily. 



EDWARD HABEEB 
"eddie" 

Lieut. Cadet Corps Traffic Squad 4 

"Eddie" is the sort of fellow who would 
not pass by a friend in his auto without 
stopping to give him a lift. He is always 
ready and willing to share his good for- 
tune with his friends. Eddie was a lieu- 
tenant in our cadet corps and performed 
his duties very creditablv- We wish you 
the best of good limes, "Eddie". 




To. 



29 



t 




ROSE JOSEPHINE HADDAD 
Basketball 4 

Rose is rather a shrinking violet m4io 
blooms in the field of basketball. She is 
always willing to help others and has 
gained many friends. \^ e wish for vou. 
Rose, the things that you desire most for 
vourself. 



GRACE ELIZABETH HALEY 

Grace has a winning smile and a charm- 
ing manner which will give her a tremen- 
dous boost on the road to success. Her 
fine traits of character are such as to win 
her many friends. We wonder if you're 
as quiet out of school. Smile your wav to 
the top. Grace. 






HO.\OR WOODHOL SE HARRIS 
"nonny" 

"Nonny" has great scholastic ability and 
is strong for her studies but unfortunately 
she has a weakness for spring days. Her 
ability shown during high s?hool will carry 
her successfully through college and a 
career. F elix iter. Honor. 



30 




ANNIE LANGFORD HARRISON 
Secretary 1 Traffic Squad 2 

Vie all admire Annie for her sincerity 
and frankness. Her ambition and her fair- 
ness, demonstrated in her school life, have 
gained for her the high respect of her class- 
mates and teachers. An ideal American 
girl — our Annie. 





JOHN JOSEPH HEALEY. JR. 
"jack" 

When we first entered M. H. S. "Jack" 
was just one of our green Sophomores, but 
it didn t take very long before he began to 
make himself known: and now he ranks 
as one of our most popular sheiks. "Jack" 
leads a great life with that car he drives. 



RUDOLPH LOUIS HEIDER 
"rldy" 
Orchestra 1. 2. .3 

"Rudy" is a rising young violinist whose 
future as a musician is extremelv bright. 
He has given freely of his talent at many 
of our social affairs. "Rudy" was one of the 
boys who completed the technical course, 
distinguishing himself in science. His fine 
disposition has gained him scores of 
friends. 




To. 



31 




EDNA EDITH HILL 
Basketball 2 

Edna's natural beauty has won for her 
the enviable title of Class Queen. We're 
quite sure that this honor couldn't be bo- 
s' owed upon a sweeter little miss. Edna 
has been active in music, too; her sinking 
has been a real accomplishment. And by 
l' e wav, she drives a Ford. N'est-ce pas, 
Edna? 



FREDERICK JACKSON HILL 
"red" 

Foo:ball 3 Baseball 3 

Various Committees 

"Red" is a neatly dressed boy whose 
conservative style has set an example 
for the current mode. His taste in clothes 
has been admired by everyone. His care- 
free nature will always help him to sur- 
mount obstacles as it has in high school. 
We wish vou luck. "Red"! 



I 




JOEL BATEMAN HILL 
"ant" 

Lieut. Cadet Corps Orchestra 2. 3 

Joel will long be remembered for his 
generous, carefree disposition. He's a 
good boy at heart, but we fear he would 
rather go out nights than slay home and 
study. Naughtv, naughty, Joel ! But it's 
true that we all envy your light-hearted 
nature, Joel. 



32 



RUTH HOYT 
"ruthie" 

Field Hockey 3, 4 Basketball 2, 3, Capt. 4 
Student Council 4 Junior Play 

Book Committee 

Ruth is well known for her many 
achievements in school sports. She is a 
good sport too — the personification of fair 
play. Ambitious and sensible — highly 
esteemed by all — Ruth has set a fine ex- 
ample for all of us. Good luck to you, 
Ruth. 





ALLAN SOUTHWORTH INGALLS 
"al" "sam" 
President 1 Football 3, 4 

Vice-President 2 Baseball 2, 3. Capt. 4 
Various Committees 
Would you like to be entertained by a 
private circus? Then just get "Al" to 
start his famous clowning. It must be 
seen to be appreciated. "Al" has kept up 
the Ingalls' tradition in athletics, too; he 
has distinguished himself in football and 
as baseball captain. We wish you the 
brightest smiles of Lady Luck, "Al". 



MILDRKD HARRIET JESSE 
"millie" 

If ever you are in need of sympathy or 
understanding you will always find it in 
"Millie", our little Miss Cheerful no mat- 
ter the weather. "Millie" is accredited also 
with that seldom heard but often sought 
title: Old Fashioned Girl. We wonder at 
the advisability of this, though, after being 
with her fifth period in Drawing. But 
then "to err is human", you know,"'Millie". 




33 




"^4 




JAMES EVERETT JOHNSON 
"evvie" 

"Evvie" is a happy-go-lucky boy who 
has proved himself a regular fellow and 
gained many friends. Nothing bothers 
Everett! He has enlivened manv a class 
and gathering with his wit and humor. 
His Ford has been famed in many an 
anecdote. "Evvie" is an accomplished 
dancer, too. 



ANNA KATINAS 

Anna is very well liked by all who know 
her and she has loads of friends. She is a 
pleasant classmate and her companionship 
is sought by many. We will remember 
you, Anna, as being successful in your 
commercial activities. 





DOROTHY KENT 
"dot" 

If you haven't met Dorothy, it would be 
well worth your while to look her up. We 
have found her a pleasant and fun loving 
companion. "Dot" is quite the rage at 
Standwood Park. May you always be able 
to dance awav vour cares, "Dot". 



34 



GEORGE KHOURY 

George appears to be a quiet studious 
fellow who has chosen to uphold the honor 
of the boys in the commercial department. 
And from all reports he has succeeded ad- 
mirably. Keep it up, George, you have 
our best wishes. 





ISABELLE ANN KFOURY 
Poetry Editor Blue and White 4 

A girl in a million who has an ideal 
and keeps to it (or him). If anv of you 
folks have any questions to ask about 
Ibsen, Shelley, Keats, Pope, or Shakes- 
peare — line forms on the right, please. 
But all joking aside, Isabelle, we have a 
right to expect a good deal from you. It 
is not every school that can boast of such 
a poetess and writer combined. 



DOROTHY HARRIET LEARNED 
"dot" 

Field Hockey 4 Various Committees 

Did you ever see "Dot" dance? If you 
haven't you've missed a lot. It isn't every 
class that has such a willing and witty 
stepper. In all our social affairs "Dot" has 
been in the fore-front. Her good looks 
and charming personality have made her 
one of our leading "heart-breakers". 
You'll never have a lack of friends, "Dot". 




35 




VALERIA CONSTANCE LOCHES 

Folks, meet one of our foremost artists. 
We just can't help being proud of Valeria, 
for don't we all wish that we, too, could 
draw those marvelous girls? Valeria 
seems to be a quiet girl, but appearances 
are deceiving and we wonder. Valeria is 
a high ratins student, too. which proves 
that her ability is not confined to art. 



REGINA MARY LUKAUSKAS 

Regina is one of the fairer members of 
our class. Regina means queen according 
to its derivation; we would say that it is 
indeed a fitting appellation. Regina is a 
member of the office squad — you know, the 
ones that bring around the notices — and we 
always welcome her appearance. Good 
luck. Regina! 





MARJORIE JEAN LYONS 

"MARJ" 

We hear that "Marj" is desirous of be- 
coming a private secretary — preferably a 
big Wall Street business man. It's a cinch 
you can make good. "Marj". Marjorie is 
one of the very highest ranking students of 
the class — and she has continued Latin 
four years, too. By the way, Marjorie likes 
spring days, too; isn't it so, "Marj"? 



36 



FRANCIS WALLACE MANAHAN 
"mike" 

Lieut. Cadet Corps Various Committees 

Wherever we turn we see "Mike". He's 
either telling a joke or listening to one. 
"Mike" has taken a little of the seriousness 
out of this old world, which is truly a 
helpful asset. Good for you, "Mike"! 





MESROB DER MESROBIAN 
"mezzy" 

Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4 Basketball 3, 4 

"Mezzy" doesn't talk much, but all he 
has to do is put that grin of his in full 
play and we are all his pals. He toots a 
mean instrument in our esteemed orchestra. 
He's an important man on the basketball 
team, too. "Mezzy" is a straight shooter 
all around. 



ROBERT MILLS 
"bobby" 

Orchestra 2, 3 Football 3, 4 

Baseball 3, 4 

Move over, Ronald Colman, "Bobby" 
Mills graduates this year. That Mills 
fellow is quite a sheik, you know. We 
number "Bobby" among our versatile ath- 
letes, too. "Bobby" has fumbled on the 
gridiron, made errors on the diamond, and 
missed shots from the foul line. You can 
take a joke can't you, "Bobby"? 




37 



WALTER RICHARD MINZNER 




Walter surprised us all when the Senior 
ranks were made up by appearing among 
the first ten of the list. But then we might 
have expected that from such an earnest 
student as Walter. Walter has always 
presented a neat appearance in school. Al- 
together you possess all the qualities that 
make a fine young man, Walter. 




COBURN MIRFIELD 

Coburn deserves a great deal of credit 
for his self-reliance and perseverance. He 
doesn't waste a single minute in his classes 
or study periods. We all feel confident 
that he will continue his good work. If 
everyone were as helpful and cheerful as 
Coburn this would be a better world. Keep 
in step, Coburn! 




BEVERLY EWELL MITCHELL 
"bev" 

Literary Editor, Blue and White 4 

Class Historian Book Committee 

Junior Play Various Committees 

Here is our eccentric "Bev", a little bit 
cf the old-fashioned girl combined with 
the modern spirit. Poet, traveller, and 
author — what a combination and what a 
girl! "Bev" has done more work for us 
than we can ever thank her for. We hear 
she wants to be a dietitian. Well, we all 
have to eat, "Bev"! 



38 



ROBERT ALEXANDER MITCHELL 
"bob" 



"Bob" is a modest and retiring young 
man whose abilities are not altogether con- 
fined to school work. His classmates have 
come to appreciate "Bob's" quiet friend- 
liness. He has always been a firm sup- 
porter of school affairs. Thanks for the 
auto rides. "Bob"! 




MADELELNE CLAIRE MONETTE 

Claire is one of our prettiest. Whenever 
you see a group of high school sheiks you 
may be sure to find Claire somewhere 
around. And it isn't everyone who can 
wear that dashing bob. We hope that you 
realize your ambitions, Claire, and that 
your hosts of friends continue to grow. 



JAMES HERMAN MOORE 
"mitt" 

Sgt. Maj. Cadet Corps TrafiBc Squad 2 

"Mitt" is everybody's pal. His willing- 
ness has shown itself through the fine co- 
operation which he has given his class- 
mates at many social events. "Mitt" is 
generally there to check your hat or sell 
you ice cream. We hope you may be able 
to keep up your many friendships, "Mitt". 




39 




KATHARINE TERESA MORAN 
■'kay" 

"Kay" is one of our commercial students 
with that merry smile that always lurks in 
the corners of her mouth. In her Junior 
year she began to put her hair up so we 
hardly knew our little miss. We all just 
live for that day though when she puts it 
in curls again like a "freshie". Please 
don't grow up too fast, "Kay", for we like 
you as you are. 



JOHN PHILIP MURPHY 

"mickey" 

Our dear fun-loving "Mickey" becomes 
proficient in anything he takes up. What 
a dancer! If he would "take up" his les- 
sons who knows what would happen to 
Einstein's place of supremacy? Relatively 
speaking, you're O. K., "Mickey"! 





ADELLE NADER 

Adelle is a quiet girl with a willingness 
to work both for herself and for others. 
This has won her the admiration of all who 
know her. She has displayed proficiency 
in typewriting and commercial subjects. 
We hope you will find the road to success 
easy, Adelle. 



3, 



40 



HARRY NOORIGIAN 
"zeke" "flash" 
Football 4 

Among our well-dressed and finely 
groomed youn<? men we number Harry. 
Like Jimmy Walker, Harry believes that 
clothes help make the man. Harry came 
out for football in his senior year and 
promptly won the nickname of "Flash". 
He is always ready to tempt Lady Luck, 
too. Folks, let's sive a cheer for "Flash". 





WILLIAM RAYMOND PAPLASKAS 
"bill" 

"Bill" is one of the more serious mem- 
bers of our class, but he's always ready to 
appreciate good humor. In his own quiet 
manner "Bill" has made himself very pro- 
ficient in his chosen subjects. We feel sure 
that "Bill" will leave Methuen High School 
to bring credit lo his class. 



.lAMES CHARNEY PARR 
"jimmie" 
Traffic Squad 2 

One doesn't very often see "Jimmie" 
with a real serious look on his face. He 
is very sociable and always knows the 
news. There is always room for one more 
somewhere in "Jimmie's" new Ford, too. 
Don't forget us, "Jimmie", for we certain- 
ly can't forget you. 




41 




DORIS PATRICK 

"dot" 
Graduation Speaker 



Doris is one of the more outstanding 
g'rls of the senior class. Her scholastic 
ratings have always been of the highest. 
Her contagious smile has been a sunny in- 
fluence in all her classes. She and her 
ever constant friend Ruth have done much 
to enliven school. May success come your 
way, Doris. 



WILLIAM KIMBALL PATRICK 

"bill" "pat" 
Basketball 2, 3 Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4 

"Bill" is a fellow who is talented in 
many, many ways. Bill is in his glory on 
field day, when he carries off numerous 
honors. As an artist "Bill" excels. His 
drawings are certainly deserving of praise. 
As a violin player "Bill" is superb. A boy 
of your ability is capable of great things, 
"Bill". 




RAYMOND ATKINSON PEARSON 
"ray" 

"Ray's" personality is his main asset, in 
that it brings him innumerable friends and 
companions. He's a good sport and takes 
an active part in all of our social events. 
What would school be without sheiks like 
"Ray"? 




42 



JOSEPH DANA PERKINS 
"joe" 

Student Council 3, 4 Football 4 

Lieut. Cadet Corps Traffic Squad 

"Joe" is our popular drug store cowboy. 
He sure can mix those sodas! He served 
faithfully on the Student Council, but he 
never got up nerve enough to ask for a 
picnic— did you, "Joe"? "Joe's" favorite 
study seemed to be chemistry — how that 
boy could break test tubes! You can take 
a joke, can't you, "Joe"? 





DAVID ALLEX PETERSON 
"dave" "pete" 
Major Cadet Corps Traffic Squad 4 

Asst. Business Mgr. Blue and White 4 
Junior Play Book Committee 

Orchestra 1. 2. 3. 4 
Did you ever hear "Pete" go tweet, 
tweet, tweet? How the crowds used to 
gather around at football games when 
you started jazzing up our football song, 
Dave! However, not only is "Pete" a 
famous sax player but he is also our dash- 
ing major. Enough said! 



VERA PICKLES 
Hockey 4 Orchestra 2, 3, 4 

Vera is one of our quiet, shy girls with 
an ever-ready sweet smile. She is an earn- 
est student who has done much to make 
our social affairs a success. Vera is think- 
ing of becoming a teacher. We are sure 
that she will come through with flying 
colors. However, beware of football 
heros, Vera. 




43 




ELLA HELEN POLLARD 
Field Hockey 2. 3. 4 Basketball 3, 4 

Ella was above all a great help to our 
school athletics. She had school spirit and 
plenty of it. Ella was always on hand at 
the games either yelling and cheering or 
playing herself. Ella was an ambitious 
debater, too. We wish you everv good for- 
tune. Ella. 



JAMES ARTHUR PORTER 
■■jimmie" 
\ arious Committees 

Genial "Jimmie " is the personification 
of good-nature. You know him. he s that 
snappy appearing clerk who dispenses 
sodas with such nonchalant ease to fair 
young ladies. ""JimmieV friendships 
speak for themselves. You can't go wrong 
with "Jimmie"! 





ELEANOR ROSE QUINN 
''qlin.me"' 
Field Hockey 2 

"Quinnie has a sweet disposition and 
a ready smile. She is quick to appreciate 
good humor whenever it may appear. 
Eleanor is a fine Latin student, having com- 
pleted the entire four-year course with 
creditable ranks. Her friends will remem- 
ber her as a good sport and a pleasant 
companion. 



44 





f5 



charle:s atherton richardson 

"charlie" 
Graduation Speaker 

"Charlie" is a level-headed, clear-think- 
ing young man who has attained an en- 
viable record in the field of technical 
subjects. He also has the distinction of 
beino; chosen by the class as a graduation 
speaker. Charlie has time for other things 
besides school books, too; he has made 
many friends. We feel sure that vou will 
win more honors in furthering your ed- 
ucation, Charlie. 




ALFRED ROBINSON 

Alfred is a boy with a very likeable per- 
sonality and somewhat of a curiosity com- 
plex. He dearly loves to ask questions. 
And what questions! Especially in chem- 
istry. We hope that you realize your am- 
bitions in the realms of science, Alfred. 



JOHN EASTMAN ROOKS 
"johnny" "rooksie" 
Football .3 Basketball 3 

Baseball 3 Capt. Cadet Corps 

Traffic Squad Various Committees 

"Johnny" is one who has certainly 
helped to make school a lively place. He 
is always full of pep and good humor. 
"Johnny" is a versatile athlete — he made 
his letter in three sports. He's also quite 
a soldier; have you seen the medals he 
totes on his chest? It's a great life, 
"Johnnv"! 




To. 



45 





LILLIAN SADLER 

Lillian is one of our rays of sunshine. 
She is always laughing even though her 
giggles sometimes bring her misfortune. 
She is the sort of girl almost anyone could 
I'ke. "Laugh and live" seems to be Lil- 
lian's motto. 



MAE VIRGINIA SCANLON 

Mae is a popular member of our class 
whose cheerful smile has certainly bright- 
ened up her English class. She is seldom 
seen without her "side-kick", Hazel Sug- 
den. They make a great combination! 
Good wishes, Mae. 





HERMAN WALTER SCHOELZEL 
Lieut. Cadet Corps Junior Play 

Traffic Squad 4 

If you haven't heard of Herman, you 
can't blame him. He has achieved the dis- 
tinction of being able to destroy more 
peace and quiet than anyone else in our 
class. Herman came into prominence with 
his well-portrayed character in the Junior 
Play. He has also made one of the finest 
lieutenants in the cadet corps. You may 
be assured of his continued success. 



46 



MARY AGNES SCHRUENDER 

Mary is a quiet girl with a cute bob that 
is quite different. She has been actively 
connected with our commercial depart- 
ment. Although she is of a retiring dis- 
position, we have been quick to appreciate 
her f:ne qualities. 





GERTRUDE LILYANE SCHWARTZ 

"gertie" 
News Editor Blue and White 4 

"Gertie" is our foremost exponent of 
whoopee. She can get away with anything. 
Even with that collegiate spelling of her 
middle name. "Gertie" is very quiet. We 
mean when she is sound asleep. The "un- 
holy three" would he desolate without her 
extremely audible presence. It's a great 
old world, "Gertie". 



ALEXINA FLORENCE SCOTT 
"scottie" 

"Scottie" is one of our quiet smiling 
classmates. She has a pleasing disposition 
and is always willing and ready to help 
whenever she can be of aid. She has shown 
marked ability in commercial work. Suc- 
cess to you in a business career, Florence. 




47 




DOROTHY KEIGHLEY SEISIG 

"dot" 

Salutatorian Student Council 2, 3, 4 

Traffic Squad 2 Orchestra 1, 2, 3 

"Dot" is our most brilliant girl, our 
class salutatorian, and she's so modest 
about her scholastic achievements! Far be 
it from us to convey the idea that "Dot" 
is tied down solely to study. We challenge 
you to find a more versatile and modern 
young lady anywhere. We salute our 
salutatorian ! 



CLARA WINIFRED SETTLE 

"WINNIE" 

We expect great things from "Winnie" 
in upholding the reputation of our class in 
her artistic endeavors. She has clever taste 
and has produced many exquisite draw- 
ings. Her ever-ready assistance has often 
proved of much value. You've been a fine 
classmate, "Winnie". 






KATHERYN EVELYN STEELE 
"kay" 
Field Hockey 4 

Katheryn's cheerfulness has brought 
many lighter moments to our class roonis. 
She showed us all how to chase away the 
bluej. We wish you bon voyage and a 
happy life in whatever road you choose 
to travel, Katheryn. 



I. 



48 





WALTER KERTCHER STOEHRER 

Walter is one of our bi<^ boys with a lot 
of big-heartedness to go along with his 
large stature. He has maintained fine rec- 
ords in our science departments. Walter in- 
variably takes things in a cheerful mood. 
That accounts for the number of friends he 
has made. We know you'll make a fine 
man, "Walt". 





HAZEL SUGDEN 

It is because Hazel is jolly, sociable and 
neat appearing that so many of her asso- 
ciates enjoy her companionship and are 
proud to call her a frientd. We feel sure, 
Hazel, that anyone possessing these quali- 
ties must have a bright and rosy future be- 
fore them. Lots of luck! 



BURLEIGH LESLIE SWAN, Jr. 

Whenever mischief has been discovered 
it has been a safe bet that Burleigh has had 
something to do with it. However, he is 
really a fine fellow. Burleigh always aims 
for the foremost. Since his sense of 
humor does not always accord with that of 
the faculty he has achieved his end by 
gaining a front seat. Why don't you be- 
have. Burleigh? 




49 




FRED SYMONS 
"freddie" 

"Freddie" is a quiet, likeable fellow. 
His sociable manner has won him a host 
of friends. Although he does not go about 
vaunting himself, we will long remember 
him. In more ways than one you have 
been a good scout, "Freddie". 



STANLEY SZOSTAK 
Track 3, 4 President 2 

Boys' Sports Editor Blue and White 4 
Lieut. Cadet Corps Traffic Squad 2, 4 

Stanley is one of our most friendly and 
likeable fellows. He has been an indus- 
trious worker in school and out, taking 
part in many class aifairs. Stanley is quite 
a track star. He used to attempt about 
half a dozen events! We hope that Stan- 
ley will always be able to keep his genial 





RICHARD ELWELL TAPLIN 
"tappie" 

"Tappie" is an earnest young man with 
a will to get ahead. Rumor has it that you 
are quite interested in the science depart- 
ment, "Tappie". We wish for you, "Tap- 
pie", the good things you are sure to de- 



50 



WILLIAM STUART TOPHAM 
"bill" 

"Bill" is a quiet retiring boy who has 
notwithstanding a contagious and engag- 
ing smile. He never seems unhappy at 
any rate. "Bill" is interested in science; 
we hope that he goes far in whatever 
work he chooses. Don't let Knightly keep 
you out late nights, "Bill"! 





ELLEN MARGARET WALKER 
Junior Play Secretary 3 

Various Committees 

One reason our Junior Play was such a 
success was the fine performance which 
Ellen turned in. Ellen is quite the spice 
of life in many a dull period. They say 
she has been nicknamed "Agricola" by 
the Latin classes. We take this to mean 
that you're the belle of Tozier's Corner, 
Ellen. 



BERNICE IRENE WHITEHEAD 
"bunny" 

Picture Committee Various Committees 

Who doesn't always associate a sunny 
smile and a helping hand with Bernice? 
We will never be able to thank her enough 
for all the time she has spent working for 
our class. Bernice is a one hundred per- 
cent booster. She's true blue to her school 
as well as a certain party that just has 
to be tended to. How about it, Bernice? 




51 




RALPH FREDERICK WOEKEL 

Baseball 2, 3 

Ralph is a baseball player, a good one, 
too. If you haven't heard that before, it's 
because he's one of the strong, silent men 
who don't sing their own praises. Ralph 
is a fine scout. We hope that you will be 
as successful in your line as your father 
is in politics, Ralph. 



JOSEPH EDWARD WOLFINDALE 
'"joe" "vvolfie" 
Football 2, 3. Capt. 4 Capt. Cadet Corps 
Baseball 3, 4 Traffic Squad 4 

Track 2 Various Committees 

"Joe" is quiet. All right, ask him to 
give a little speech and see. "Joe" be- 
lieves in action. He's a three letter man 
in athletics — football captain, baseball, 
track. "Joe" is surpassed by none in pop- 
ularity. It must be that correspondence 
rours". Never mind. "Joe ', we re all for 
you. 




52 



T T was a warm August Saturday in 1928 when young Johnny Doubtful 
read the Tribune after working hard weeding in his Dad's garden. From 
continual contact with the soil his begrimed hands were hot and rough. 
Even though he had no stated hours and only an allotted amount of work 
to do, he wondered ruefully whether it was worth 75 cents a day, an arrange- 
ment which had been made at his own request, or had he better go to High 
School as a Sophomore in the fall with the rest? 

Working had its advantages. When Johnny wanted to treat Mary 
Sweet the money was ever handy. When he finished his work in time he 
could go fishing or swimming while the other boys and girls toiled at their 
books. Yet, Johnny thought, if he went to High School he could in time 
earn more money as the result of his accumulated knowledge, and instead 
of spending his spare time fishing and swimming in the summer, of course 
he could play football, be a cadet, and have loads of fun with the other 
boys all the year round. He could read books and learn all about the 
famous men and places of which he had heard so much. When Johnnv saw 
the announcement of the opening of school all this went quickly through his 
mind. He grinned to himself and decided that school could not be such 
a bad place after all even if he could not have his spare moments to himself 
and extra money with which to treat Mary Sweet. 

Thus it happened that Johnny Doubtful became Johnny Hopeful Sopho- 
more and joined the others, who, doubtless, had similar reasons for ap- 
proaching this impressive edifice on that memorable Wednesday after Labor 
Day in the fall of 1928. 

The first few days were trj'ing on their gentle systems, as they were 
not used to the boisterous joking that was given them by those awe-inspiring 
persons who had been known as dignified Seniors. They seemed more 
like persons utterly lacking in a sense of humor for they made those poor 
Sophomores' lives miserable with their continual bantering. Many a poor 
Sophomore has been late for class merely because a playful Senior sent 
him to the third floor. This bantering lessened as the Sophomores became 
familiar with their new surroundings. 

As a group the class first expressed itself officially by electing Stanlev 

53 



Szostak, President; Ted Brouder, Vice-President; "Pete" Jessel, Secretary; 
and Charlie Averill, Treasurer. 

The Sophomores' newly acquired dignity was tested by a formal re- 
ception given to them by the Seniors. The familiar hall of the Central 
School helped those who were still awed by formal occasions to forget them- 
selves long enough to enjoy the evening. 

T^Tiile the class of '31 was still in its creeping days they had the honor 
of choosing the ring which was to become the symbol of the school. Here- 
tofore each class had chosen its own ring. The new ring, in a beautiful 
black and gold design, changes only the numerals in accordance with the 
class to which the owner belongs. 

As the group became Juniors some became confident enough to add to 
their academic programs Glee Club and Chorus work; some of the girls 
chose Red Cross; drawing and orchestra seemed inviting to others; while 
still others accepted their first chance to try at the assisting in the manage- 
ment of the school paper. Altogether they were becoming full-fledged 
students. 

As Juniors they gloated over the incoming Sophomores with no pity 
in their hearts. It has even been said they were worse than the Seniors 
in playing their little jokes on the green ones. Their realm of bantering 
lay not only within the walls of the school for one unfortunate Sopho- 
more girl was directed to the Central School for the gymnasium instead of 
the Chapel on the third floor. How quick they were to imitate! 

The class officers for this year were Edward Brouder, President; Allan 
Ingalls, Vice-President; Ellen Walker, Secretary; and Peter Jessel was 
reelected for his second term as a class officer, which showed how much a 
good man is appreciated. 

As a group the Juniors' contribution to the athletic part of the school 
was unequalled. Junior men appeared in every sport the school offered. 
A large percentage won recognition on the grid, while others did equally 
as well on the basketball floor and on the tennis courts. At the first signs 
of Spring the men of '31 could be seen toiling on the cinder path or on the 
diamond. The girls, not to be outdone, won fame on the basketball floor 
and in the intensely interesting game of hockey, which had lately been 
introduced into the school. 

During the Spring vacation of the Junior year the girls lost their 
esteemed friend and physical instructor. Miss McNeil, who, in their Sopho- 
more year had taken the place of Miss Warburton. Because of her death 
the Athletic Association voted to omit the annual Girls' Athletic Demon- 
stration. 

Not even Charlie Averill, using Miss Allen's best English, can put 



54 




into words the attainment reached, with Mrs. Thompson's help, in the 
annual Junior play. Past, present, and future students flocked to the 
Central School to see the selected ones as dramatists in "Adam and Eva". 
They were not disappointed. The characters in the play brought out the 
humor which supplied many a hearty laugh for the audience. The play 
as a whole was most difficult as it needed older and more experienced actors 
to portray the parts. Regardless of this handicap, the players made a 
success both dramatically and financially for the class of '31. 

In June the group attended their second Senior Chapel which was 
perhaps the first time that they were impressed with the seriousness of it. 
To the tune of Auld Lang Syne the Seniors passed before them; some with 
clouded brows; some with relief; others with wonderment as if only at the 
last had they come to realize what school actually meant. 

As far as officers were concerned there were but two changes in the 
Senior year: Charles Averill became Vice-President and John Tordoff^, 
Treasurer. 

As Seniors the group could well be called the personification of all 
that was dignified. They gloated in hearing whispered, "He's a Senior" 
as they sauntered through the corridors with the air of one who owned the 
school. But regardless of humorous moments and love of publicit\% they 
had arrived at the point of the breaking or making of each one. (Most of 
them were broke, by the way.) It meant serious contemplation in everv 
thing that was done, for the under classes were bound to imitate as they had 
imitated others. 

At the beginning of the year with the guidance of Mr. Carty, a sub- 
stitute, a Debating Society was organized. Although never in action never- 
theless it was a seed planted in the minds of the under classmen, who, in 
the coming years, might bask under its spreading branches of orator\'. 

The school paper under the leadership of everybody's friend, Mr. 
Bagnell, and the Editor, Ted Brouder, proved to be a better one than here- 
tofore. Little changes and additions both in the making of the book and in 
the contents are marked. The cooperation of the drawing classes helped 
make it pleasing to the eye. Future poets, writers, and humorists have 
become noted as contributors. The editors have worked doubly hard to 
make each issue better than the last. 

In athletics the class has conquered in more ways than one. Last year 
the Senior class had the misfortune of having no one capable to hold the 
position of football captain; this year there were two boys who vied for the 
honor. 

The girls have had a splendid year under the guidance of their friend 
Miss Chadwick. They worked diligently all winter for the first A. A. Dem- 





55 



onstration in two years, and they were well repaid for the time spent. In 
basketball and hockey the girls showed that they could play as interesting 
a game as the boys. 

The crowning social event of the Senior year was the Military Ball. 
The papers stated that it was the best and most beautiful that had ever been 
staged under the roof of the Central School. Let that suffice. No mere 
words can express the beauty and charm of the ladies and the handsome 
gallant cadets who marched before envious eyes. Never before has a major 
made such a lasting impression on the ladies. 

Now as the graduating class, that group which entered in the fall of 
'28 are about to separate, as individuals they again commence to wonder. 
Some are asking the question of Little Johnny Doubtful — "Shall I go on?" 

Those who have proved themselves outstanding in their several lines 
are many. 

In literature and poetry students the class is rich. Who will ever 
forget Isabelle's poems in the Blue and White? Ted's interesting editorials 
which are a pleasure to read? The three musketeers of the Humor Column, 
Charlie, Georgie, and Buddy? Even this year brought out finds in the 
world of poetry. Bernice Whitehead, James Parr, and Allan Ingalls have 
sprung from beneath their bushels at last. 

In Art there are the sociable Cliff Burby, Valeria Loches and a new 
one among us, Garabed Bedrosian. 

In history there are Johnny Tordoff and Charlie Averill who captured 
the medal last year. 

In athletics the girls are a credit to the school. Ruthie, Helen, Danie, 
Jennie, Ella and many others have put Methuen on the map as far as basket- 
ball and hockey are concerned. 

There are many boy athletes among the class of '31. Joe, the capable 
football captain, is one of which to be proud. Speaking of Joe brings to 
mind his pal and the class's pal, Cebbie. What would Methuen have done 
without you on the gridiron? Booster's Day introduced the baseball season. 
The M. H. S. boys, with Allan Ingalls as Captain, played the Hanover, 
Massachusetts, High School who had Allan's brother, Beverly Ingalls, 
M. H. S. '25, as coach. "Red" Atkinson on the basketball floor moves so 
fast that the crowd stands up to keep track of him. Bill may complain in 
later life because he is small but if it were not so in High School enabling 
him to sneak through the opponents' legs, there would be many games that 
. .:uld go to the other team. 

Speaking of legs: Lincoln once said he cared nought for legs except 
that they reach from the body to the ground and function at the will of 
their owner. So it is with our knowledge: care not except that it reach from 
you to your need and that it serve you at command. 

— Beverly Ewell Mitchell 

fo. 



56 



T TOW foolish is the man who thinks that his future has been mapped out 
^ for him and his destiny sealed! He lacks ambition; he places no 
trust in himself; he refuses to use his will power; he has no hope for attain- 
ing success. 

If a man believes in predestination, he has no ambition. He expects 
something to happen, but not through his own effort. He is not ambitious 
enough to try to make anything turn out any particular way. He believes 
that it will turn out the way that it was arranged anyway, so it will be useless 
for him to try. For this reason, he can not be ambitious. Before the 
twentieth century, there was no progress in countries governed by the Turk, 
who is a believer in fatalism, which is materially the same as predestination. 
Believing that all things were meant to be as they are, he used the same 
implements as his fathers, and made no effort to improve his condition. 

li a man believes in predestination, he places no trust in himself. He 
places all his trust in some foolish dream, so it might be said that he has 
no trust left for anything else. 

If a man believes in predestination, he refuses to use his will power. 
Man was created with a will, which he was meant to use. If he believes 
in predestination, he throws away three-fourths of his will-power and joins 
the "dumb-driven cattle" group that are never chosen as leaders. Where 
would Theodore Roosevelt have been, had it not been for his unconquerable 
will. He was a weak boy with asthma who built himself up to be a muscle- 
bound athlete. Another example of the use of will-power is the life of 
Helen Keller. She was, at the early age of two years, stricken deaf, dumb, 
and blind. By the use of her will-power, she became able to speak and 
read. Later, she entered Radcliffe College, from which she graduated witli 
an A.B. degree. 

If a man believes in predestination, he is lost before he starts. He 
waits too long for opportunity to knock. But when the knock comes, he 
finds the wolf, and not opportunity, waiting at the door. How often did 
Sidney Carton, that appealing character of the Tale of Two Cities, wish 
for luck? How long did he wait for opportunity to knock? He, too, found 
nothing that mattered in life because he did not have backbone that could 
make success without waiting for luck. 




57 



How different is the man who is out to make a name for himself 
through his own hard work! He gets more out of life because he puts more 
into it. He keeps to the path that he wants to follow. He does not roam 
from side to side, wondering which path he is supposed to follow, 

Phillips Brooks has said: "Do not pray for easy lives, pray to be 
stronger men. Do not pray tasks equal to your powers, pray for powers 
equal to your tasks." 

Take the lesson that the ivy plant gives us. When it starts on its 
upward trend to the heights of the wall, it is determined to reach the top. 
Not once in all its long course does the ivy turn its aim aside for relaxation 
or rest. It is determined to do that which it set out to do and to do it well. 
Will-power, ambition and stick-to-it-iveness will make that compound that 
Nature can show to all the world and say, "This is a man." 

— James T. Dunn, Jr. 



I. 



58 



Scene: Methuen Airport Waiting Room. 
Time: June, 1941. 

Characters: Florence Dane — Reporter for the Methuen Transcript. 
George Dawson — Business man. 
{Action supplied as necessary by alleged characters) 

George: I see by the headlines that Allan Ingalls' Rabbit Farm has 
been robbed. "Fiends Attempt Daylight Robbery; Foiled by Hero Farm 
Hands." According to the accounts, the heros, William Topham and 
Francis Manahan, have received offers from manager Philip Murphy to 
appear on the stage of the Methuen Theatre in a special exhibition. 

Florence: Yes, and I see that the culprits, Ted Brouder, Pete Jessel, 
and Jimmy Parr, who were identified by a prominent street cleaner, James 
H. Clifford, claim that it was a publicity stunt by the proprietor of the 
ranch, Southworth Ingalls. 

George: Look here. There's a divorce suit. "Professional Football 
Star and Wrestler Seeks Annulment of Marriage Vows. Matthew Cebula 
Claims Abusive Treatment. Mrs. Cebula, the former Miss Vera Pickles, 
refutes charges." 

Florence: Yes, it says here that Everett Johnson, attorney for the 
plaintiff, will produce evidence in the nature of black and blue marks on 
the person of Mr. Cebula. However, Charles Richardson, appearing for 
the defendant, will claim that these bruises were sustained during his recent 
match with Walter Stoehrer, the Gas House Gigolo, for the Walter Davis 
Trophy. Justice W. H. Minzner will preside at the trial. 

George: I see the Marines are having more trouble in Nicaragua. It 
seems that the insurgents, led by Senor Raymond Pearson and General 
Don Pedro William Patrick, latest aspirant to the office of President of 
Nicaragua, have been quelled by a squad of Marines under Corporal David 
Peterson. Privates Herman Schoelzel and Joel Hill have been cited for 
bravery for rescuing Misses Dorothy Learned and Ella Pollard, missionar)- 
welfare workers, from the hands of the infidels. 

Florence: It says that two of the captive rebels, Burleigh Swan and 



4^1 1 ^-^ 



59 



Rudolph Heider will be shot at sunrise. Good Heavens! Another gang 
war in Chicago. "Rival mobs contend over open season on pedestrians. 
Mayor William Budd opened the season by throwing out the first machine 
gun. 

George: According to this, James Thomas Dunn, Jr., alias Gun Dunn, 
and his henchmen, Everett Cookson, Bill Paplaskas, and Richard Taplin, 
have sent Mayor Budd an invitation to go for a ride. 

Florence: Look here! Madame Claire Monette, noted contralto on 
the Campbell's Soup Chorus, sues Manager Gertrude Beaumont. Claire 
claims that Gertrude's jealous actions caused her to lose a movie contract 
with Clifford C. Burby, President of Cowboy Pictures, Inc. Gertrude denies 
all charges, however. 

George: I see that Ralph Woekel seeks re-election as town fence 
viewer. His opponents are Rosemary Allatt, candidate of the Socialist 
Party, and Annie Harrison, Farm Labor nominee. Ralph's followers claim 
easy victory for their candidate by a total of seventeen votes. 

Florence: Well! Well! Look at this ad: "Ye Olde Cosmetic Station". 
They're having a one cent sale. Look who's running the establishment! 
Three of our old classmates, Ellen Walker, Dorothy Kent, and Leah Bibbins. 

George: You say there's a one cent sale? Oh, yes! I see it. Haircut, 
forty cents. Haircut and trim, forty-one cents. Here's another ad: "Mil- 
dred Pagan, Modiste". Mildred advertises a special dress designer from 
Paris's most exclusive style salon. This designer will give personal atten- 
tion to each gown purchased by Mildred's customers. Gracious, look who 
it is! Monsieur Joseph Jean Pierre Wolfindale. 

Florence: There's an item here stating that John Tordoff has been 
elected treasurer of the Essex County Training School Alumni. Johnny's 
getting up in the world. 

George: Yes, and here's a personal item. "John Tordoff recently 
ordered a new Cadillac roadster from the agency of Edward Habeeb." 

Florence: Did you notice this ad? "Local agent and dealer in Soda 
Fountain Polish. Business experience of twenty years. Joseph Dana Per- 
kins, Inc." 

George: Here's a sport item. "Hoyt Baffles Yank Batsmen. Only 
Girl Pitcher in Big Leagues." Well! Well! If it isn't our Ruth! Accord- 
ing to this, Ruth, not yet recuperated from her operation, struck out among 
other Yank sluggers, Bobby Mills and Jack Healey. 

Florence: Yes! And here's another sports write-up. "Flash Noorigian 
Smashes Through To Checker Championship. Defeats Brilliant Field of 
Contestants." 

George: Among those lasting into the final round were Fred Symons 

I. 
60 




and Coburn Mirfield. Mitt Moore, the referee, was injured during the 
semi-finals by a flying checker. 

Florence: Listen to this. "Children Taken To Board. Park your 
kiddies with us and enjoy the matinee. Best of care and attention. Doris 
Patrick and Ruth Archibald, Funnyside Nurseries." 

George: I see that a new radical leader has forged to the front in 
Russia. "William Ivan Atkinsonski Assumes Control of Soviet Govern- 
ment." Well! Well! I knew him when his name was Billy! "General 
Philip Cook Slays Innocent Thousands under the Direction of Atkinsonski, 
the Red Scourge of Russia." 

Florence: Yes, I see that John Manuel Rooks, the president of Mexico, 
has sold Atkinsonski a boatload of second hand electric chairs. The leaders 
of the opposing faction, Mesrob Mesrobian and Robert Brouder, have 
started a revolution at this move, claiming that it is a hindrance to the 
progress of Mexico to revert to hanging members of the opposing party. 

George: I wonder what's on the air today. Here's the radio program. 
"Blue-Jay Corn Plaster Serenaders" featuring a famous trio — Anne Bis- 
tany, Telvina Crawlin, and Ruth Feindel. And the famous Sawdust Twins — 
Gladys Depoian and Mildred Jesse. 

Florence: How radio has depreciated! Yes, here's a speech on "How 
to Keep Young Men in Their Place" by Katherine Moran assisted at the 
piano by Lily Grenville. Here's a song, "Where Is My Wandering Boy 
Tonight?" by Miss Gertrude Schwartz, concert artist. When I was in high 
school, they had only good music on the radio. 

George: Here's the movie page. Strand Theatre. "Passion's Palpi- 
tations" featuring Edna Hill and Alfred Robinson, an epic of strong men 
made weak by syncopating sirens. It is personally directed by the eminent 
Mary Dolan. This story, written by Isabelle Ann Kfoury, noted playwright, 
deals with the underworld, the story of a subway track walker. 

Florence: I've seen the picture. The comedy relief is in the form of 
a demented grandfather, ably portrayed by Stanley Anderson. I see that 
the Premier features Helen Garbo Currie in "The Cigar Store Indians Are 
Coming", a feature serial which has run every week for the past two years. 

George: I see that Beverly Mitchell plays the part of Minnie-Ho-Hum, 
an Indian princess who falls in love with the leading man, Jimmie Porter. 
That will be one swell picture. The Star Theatre features the "Pick 
Pockets of Common Street" a sequel to "The Gold Diggers of Broadway" 
starring Honor Harris and Eleanor Quinn, two chorus girls. 

Florence: It says that Marjorie Lyons plays the part of the mother who 
saves enough to send her girls to the big city, where they make good and 




61 



— I' 




elope with two stage hands, George Khoury and Robert Mitchell. The 
picture gets a big hand from the critics. 

George: Say! Look at this headline "Strike Leader Torn from Soap 
Box. Rushed by Cordon of Police to Patrol Wagon. Shirley M. Eichhom. 
famed 'red' agitator, defies city fathers. Two of her colleagues, Marion 
Beverly and Ester Cohen, are being deported. Lawyers for the defend- 
ants, Emma De Felice and Evelyn Ellis, were planning to wage a bitter 
battle against the government." 

Florence: I hope they get out all right. Here's an application for 
employment. "Experienced stenographer and typist — best of references — 
formerly with George Enright and Co. — Local Contractor — call or write 
Thelma G. Budd." Thelma always was full of ambition. 

George: Look at this in the Methuen notes. "Important Public Notice 
per order Methuen Chief of Police, Charles Averill — 

"Will person seen taking police chief's motorcycle from 
bicycle stand outside cell number one, please return 
same and no questions will be asked. 

(Signed) Chief Averill. 
"P. S. No names will be mentioned, but if Stanley Szos- 
tak doesn't return said vehicle in good condition, the 
town hall will have a new janitor." 
Well! Well! The boys are having quite a scrap. 
Florence: I wonder what's in the "Hearts and Flowers" Department? 
Our old friend Jennie Baker is at the head of the love and sentiment column. 
Here's a short letter from none other than Bernice Whitehead: 

"I have been married for seven years. I am afraid John 
misunderstands me. What shall I do?" 
George: Here's the answer: 

"Dear Miss Whitehead: Your case is somewhat similar to 
that of Dorothy Seisig, a regular correspondent, who like you, 
was led astray by a member of a previous class. I should 
advise a vacation in Reno." 
I knew those love affairs would go along smoothly. 

Florence: I see that the Methuen Fire Department responded to a slight 
conflagration in the clothing firm of Florence Scott and Marion Chateauneuf. 
The chief of the Department, Fred Hill, was injured while rescuing a dummy 
which he mistook for one of the owners. Lillian Sadler and Beatrice Cohen, 
two of the clerks, later confessed to setting fire to the store. 

George: It is said they expected to be rescued by handsome firemen. 
Unfortunately, volunteer fireman Bruce Fielder failed to show up, and 





62 



the girls nearly died waiting. However, they were ably taken care of by 
Phyllis Eyers and Anna Katinas, nurses at the Lawrence General Hospital. 

Florence: Here's the art page, "Famed Exhibition Subjects to Be 
Sold." "Portrait of Bossy Gillis" by Garabed Bedrosian has been purchased 
by Mary Schruender for her extensive art collection. "The Return of the 
Glow Worm" by Valeria Loches has received warm praise from Mae Scan- 
Ion, art critic of the Methuen Transcript. 

George: I see that Adelle Nader as agent for Smithsonian Institute has 
purchased a painting "The Private Life of an Oyster" by Winifred Settle, 
noted submarine artist. Well! Well! I see that you girls seem to be 
standing up for your rights. 

Florence: You bet! You can't blame us. Look at this. "Regina 
Lukauskas has called an indignation meeting of the Methuen Women's 
Rights Society. Phyllis Fasullo, president of the Boston society, guest 
speaker, urged the Methuen women to beat their husbands thoroughly if 
necessary. Grace Haley objected on the grounds that she loved her husband, 
strange as it may seem. 

George: The west side Community Club is to present a play, it seems. 
I note that Muriel Dean and Elizabeth Doyle have featured roles. The 
play, "She Was Only a Farmer's Daughter", is being ably directed by 
Margaret Ganem, teacher of elocution. 

Florence: "Three prominent young women open millinery store." 
Rose Haddad, Catherine Steele, and Hazel Sugden embark on a business 
venture. We'll be reading about a fire sale in a few weeks. 

George: Well, business is business! Great Scott! Just time to make 
my plane! I must be going! See you again soon — . 



63 



Class Queen 
Handsomest Boy . 
Most Popular Boy 
Most Popular Girl 
Class Cutie 
Class Sheik 
Class Detective 
Class Sonny Boy 
Class Sport 
Class Politician 
Class Musician 
Class Vamp 
Class Ideal 
Class Bluff 
Baby Girl 
Baby Boy 
Class Quietist 
Class Redhead 
Class Sweetie 
Class Bookworm 
School Booster 
Cleverest Girl 
Cleverest Boy 
Class Wit 



. Edna Hill 
James Clifford 
oseph Wolfindale 
Helen Currie 
Florence Dane 
Stanley Cebula 
William Topham 
James Parr 
oseph Wolfindale 
Charles Averill 
David Peterson 
Dorothy Learned 
Charles Averill 
Francis Manahan 
Leah Bibbins 
Walter Davis 
Muriel Dean 
Beverly Mitchell 
Florence Dane 
Isabelle Kfoury 
David Peterson 
Dorothy Seisig 
Charles Averill 
George Dawson 



64 



Class Man-Hater 
Class Woman-Hater 
Noisiest Girl 
Noisiest Boy 
Best Dressed Boy 
Best Dressed Girl 
Class Eccentric . 
Class Brute 
Class Actor 
Class Actress 
Most Ambitious Girl 
Most Ambitious Boy 
Class Sleepiest 
Class Happiest . 
Class Old-Fashioned Gi 
Most Intelligent Boy 
Most Intelligent Girl 
Class Pessimist . 
Most Athletic Girl 
Most Athletic Boy 
Most Sociable Boy 
Most Sociable Girl 
Most Industrious 
Class Business Man 
Class Author 
Class Clown 
Class Heart Breaker 
Class Hero 
Student Who Has Done Most For The Class 



Mildred Jesse 
. William Topham 
Gertrude Schwartz 
Herman Schoezel 
Fred Hill 
. Mildred Fagan 
Beverly Mitchell 
Joseph Wolfindale 
Charles Averill 
Mildred Fagan 
Dorothy Seisig 
Charles Averill 
Everett Johnson 
Shirley Eichhorn 
Mildred Jesse 
Charles Averill 
Dorothy Seisig 
Isabelle Kfoury 
. Ruth Hoyt 
Joseph Wolfindale 
Clifford Burl)y 
Shirley Eichhorn 
Charles Averill 
James Dunn 
Isabelle Kfoury 
John Rooks 
Gilbert Boucher 
Stanley Cebula 
Charles Averill 



65 



flic mnh 



THE "M" Club came irUo existence at the time when the class of 1931 
were Sophomores, through the efforts of Mr. Thompson. It is made up 
of the boys and girls who have won a letter in athletics. The club was 
formed to promote interest in the athletics of the school and to assist in its 
general welfare. 

The club conducts a social function every year in October, the proceeds 
of which are used to further the needs of the A. A. The "M" club dance 
has increased every year in popularity, through the untiring efforts of 
Mr. Elwell and the members of the club. Upon several occasions it has 
been possible for the members to become guests at various sporting events 
in Boston. 

The organization has supplied a powerful incentive to athletics and has 
added to the distinction of winning a letter. We wish it every success and 
the continuance of its fine influence on the school. 



.5, 



69 




'"PHE members of the Book Committee and the Picture Committee have 
labored diligently in their respective fields. We have earnestly en- 
deavored to fulfill the trust reposed in us. Our success, of course, is left 
to your judgment. 

Book Committee 

Charles Averill, Chairman 
David Peterson Ruth Hoyt 

Beverly Mitchell Clifford Burby 

Picture Committee 

William Budd Bernice Whitehead 

George Dawson 



70 




' I HE Student Council consists of four Seniors, three Juniors, and two 
^ Sophomores, elected by their respective classes. It is a body which 
has provided a means whereby the diiferent classes may co-operate for the 
betterment of the school. It undertakes to establish desirable traditions, 
encourage progressive undertakings, solve school difficulties, and keep in 
relation with other schools. The Student Council has indeed proven an 
organization of service and we wish it every future success. 

Senior Class 
Charles Averill, President 
Ruth Hoyt, Secretary 

Junior Class 
Joseph Holland 

Ellen Willard 



Joseph Perkins 
Dorothy Seisig 



Sophomore Class 



Jennie Backs 



Howard Nicholson 



Louis Pozycek 



71 



OUR officers of this year have shown themselves capable in every way 
of assuming the responsibilities of their positions. Under the guidance 
of Lieut. Henry Patnaude they have formulated an organization which has 
been highly successful in all its undertakings. Our twenty-fifth annual 
Military Ball was certainly a fitting anniversary of our most colorful school 
function. Our cadets have made a fine appearance upon every occasion and 
we take a just pride in them. 



OFFICERS OF THE BATTALION 
Major .... . . David Peterson 

Adjutant ..... Clifford Burby 

Aide . . . . . . William Budd 



Captain 
1st. Lieut. 
2nd. Lieut. 

Captain 
1st. Lieut. 
2nd. Lieut. 

Captain 
1st. Lieut. 
2nd. Lieut. 



Company A 

Charles Averill 
Francis Manahan 
Peter Jessel 

Company B 

Matthew Cebula 
Edward Habeeb 
Edward Brouder 

Company C 

Joseph Wolfindale 
Herman Schoelzel 
Philip Cook 



Company D 
Captain James Clifford 

1st. Lieut. Joseph Perkins 

2nd. Lieut. Joel Hill 

Company E 
Captain John Rooks. 

1st. Lieut. Stanley Szoslak 

2nd. Lieut. William Atkinson 



Quartermaster 
Armorer 



James Dunn 
George Dawson 



73 



"T^HERE has been more interest in the Blue and White this year than ever 
before in its history. For this we have to thank Mr. Bagnell and the 
members of the fine staff of editors. Every single department has shown 
an improvement over former years. We have had an alumni issue and have 
kept up to the minute with school happenings. There has been a decided 
stimulus in circulation for which the humor section is to be credited. We 
hope these fine standards will be kept up. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



Editor- in-Chief 
Assistant Editor 
Humor Editor 
Literary Editor 
Poetry Editor 
Business Manager 
Asst. Business Manager 
Junior Asst. Business Manager 
Social Editor 
News Editor 
Boys' Athletics Editor 
Girls' Athletics Editor 
Exchange Editor . 
Faculty Adviser . 



Edward Brouder 
. Marjorie Joyal 
. Charles Averill 
Beverly Mitchell 
. Isabelle Kfoury 
James Dunn 
David Peterson 
. Hedley Borrum 
Florence Dane 
Gertrude Schwartz 
. Stanley Szostak 
Helen Currie 
. Phyllis Fasullo 
. John A. Bagnell 



75 



mttor piatr 



A DAM AND EVA", a play of typical and amusing family difficulties, 
was successfully presented on Febiuaiy 21, 1930, by the class of 
1931. A fine cast headed by Miss Milded Fa^an and Charles Averill 
turned in a performance which received universal praise. The success of 
the evening was also to be attributed to the assistance willingly rendered by 
members of committees and by the advisers of the class. 

William Budd played the part of James King, a rich man, who is 
actively engaged in the rubber business. His eldest daughter and her 
husband, played by Ellen Walker and James Dunn, live at the King residence 
and subsist upon father King as do the sister-in-law, portrayed by Beverly 
Mitchell, and the uncle, who was Herman Schoelzel. With a large house- 
hold hanging upon his head. King is anxious to "get away from it all" and 
go out into the wilds. His manager, Adam Smith, played by Charles 
Averill, has lived a lonely life and is quite willing to swap places with Mr. 
King when the proper circumstances arise. During the absence of Mr. 
King the household is changed through the efforts of Adam Smith from a 
group of idlers into industrious workers. The fine performances of Ruth 
Hoyt, David Peterson, and Edward Brouder in their respective roles deserve 
especial mention. The play was ably directed by Mrs. Leighton S. 
Thompson. 



THE CAST 



AS YOU MEET THEM 



James Kint;, a rich man . 
CoRiNTiUA, his parlor maid 
Clinton DeWitt, his son-in-law 
Jui.iE DeWitt, his eldest daughter 
Eva King, his younger daughter 
Aunt Abby Rockf.r, his sister-in- 
Dr. Jack Delamater, his neighbur 
Horace Pilgrim, his uncle 
Adam Smith, his business manager 
Lord Andrew Gordon, his would-be- 



in-la 



William Buflf! 
Ruth Hoyt 
James Dunn 
. Ellen Walker 
Mildred Pagan 
Beverly Mitchell 
David Peterson 
Merman Schoelzel 
Charles Averill 
Edward Brouder 



77 



\y4^UCH credit is due to our orchestra for its splendid achievement and 
the many services its members have willingly rendered the school. 
We are grateful for the incessant effort which Mr. Pearson has shown in 
building up this section of the musical department. 

The members of the orchestra are as follows: 

Director — Mr. Walter Pearson. 

1st Violin and Concert Master — William Patrick. 

1st Violin — Donald Liddell, Harold Franklin, Louis Pozycek, Ed- 
mund Saulnier, Richard Irving. 

2nd Violin — Evelyn Ellis, Alice Webster, William Turner, William 
Rennie. 

1st Clarinet — David Peterson. 
2nd Clarinet — Everet Smith. 

Saxophone — Coburn Mirfield, Albin Galinus, Howard Bernard. 

1st Trumpet — Bruce Fiedler. 

2nd Trumpet — Wilbur Pearson. 

Melophone — Mesrob Mesrobian. 

Trombone — Vera Pickles. 

Drums — Julius Mitchell. 

Pianist — Ruth Eyers. 

Asst. Pianist — Alice Ackroyd. 



79 




^lie Clrafftr ^quab 



'T~'HESE are our "policemen"; the ones who tried to keep us in the straight 
and narrow path. They have had to endure a lot of "kidding", hut 
everything concerned has always heen taken goodnaturedly by the traffic 
officers. The "single file" boys have acquitted themselves creditably. 



David Peterson 
William Budd 
Charles Averill 
Clifford Burby 
James Dunn 
Francis Manahan 
Philip Cook 
Matthew Cebula 



William Atkinson 



Edward Hai)eeb 
Edward Rrouder 
Joseph Wolfindale 
Herman Schoelzel 
PeLer Jessel 
Joseph Perkins 
John Rooks 
Stanley Szostak 



7 



80 




Ifootball 



WE have many reasons to be proud of our football team. It was a 
fine spirited, red-blooded, fighting eleven. Under the leadership of 
Joe Wolfindale they certainly illustrated that never-die spirit so character- 
istic of Methuen High School football teams. 

The line-up was as follows: 



John McClintock 


I.e. 


Walter P'oley 


r.e. 


Albin Galinus 


l.t. 


Ernest Partington 


r.t. 


William Budd 


l.g- 


Peter Jessel 


r.g. 


Matthew Cebula 


q.b. 


James Clifford 


c. 


Allan Ingalls 


l.h. 


Alfred Taylor 


f.b. 



Joseph Wolfindale (Capt.) 



82 




i 




basketball 



/^^UR basketball team had a very successful season. Led by Captain 
Billy Atkinson they dealt the highly touted Johnson (juintet two straight 

defeats and ran off with the suburban championship. Hats off to the boys 

and to their coach, Mr. Elwell. 

The following played: Captain William Atkinson, Lloyd Lister, Mesrob 

Mesrobian, Ernest Partington, Ardavis Stepanion, Manager James Dunn. 



83 




T7IELD HOCKEY is becoming as popular as any girls' sport in the High 
School. This is because of its unlikeness to any other sport ever in- 
troduced for girls. 

Our varsity team played only one game. This was with Beverly. Our 
girls had a strong team but the opponents were stronger. The score was 4-0. 
Our line-up was as follows: 
Captain Helen Currie Florence Dane 

Jennie Baker Dorothy Learned 

Shirley Eichhorn Arline O'Neil 

Jessie Deas Stephanie Das 

Ella Pollard Tillie Grinka 

Ruth Hoyt Barbara Thomas 

Marion Chateauneuf, Manager 



84 




(&\x\% basketball 



' I 'HE reason why our girls were more victorious this year was because they 
had additional training to that of last year. Our girls did not fight 

for individual glory but team glory which was half the battle. 

The following girls were on the squad: Captain Ruth Hoyt, Florence 

Dane, Manager Helen Currie, Phyllis Fasullo, Jennie Baker, Anna Barra- 

clough, Mona Eichhorn, Jessie Deas, Stephanie Das, Jennie Backs, and 

Barbara Dolan. 



85 




Cheer leahers 



YV/ HAT would a football game be without cheer leaders? They seem to 
be the last word at a game. Our cheer leaders worked hard for the 
boys, trying to make the day a little more successful. And will we ever 
forget Dave with his sax leading us in our football songs? When all is said 
and done, the cheer leaders are almost as necessary as the players them- 
selves. 

Our cheer leaders were Jennie Baker, David Peterson, Helen Currie, 
and Charles Averill. 



fa 



86 



'^4 



A most successful season looms before our baseball team. In the five 
games played to date, they have lost but one and that a practice game 
with Haverhill High. Led by Captain Ingalls they have displayed a fine 
brand of ball and at present are tie for first place in the suburban league. 

Both Johnson and Woodbury have suffered defeats at their hands and 
Punchard awaits a similar fate. 



I HE season of nineteen hundred and thirty-one has been quite successful 
for the boys of the track squad. The material of the lower classes 
promises some first-rate track teams in the near future. Our boys are handi- 
capped by being forced to seek meets with larger and better equipped 
schools. However, this season the Methuen squad competed with a school 
of its own class, Amesbury High, and came through to win with flying colors. 



87 



.5. 



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you — your truest self, free from stage effects and little con- 
ceits. It is in this "long run" photography that PURDY 
success has been won. Portraiture by the camera that one 
cannot laugh at or cry over in later years. For present 
pleasure and future pride protect your photographic self by 
having PURDY make the portraits. 



PLEASING PORTRAITS! PROMPT SERVICE! RIGHT PRICES! 



Official Photographer Edw. F. Searles H. S. Classes 1930-1931 



I" 



i' 



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BOSTON, MASS. 




J, 



EDWARD'S DAIRY 

Pasteurized Milk and Cream 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 

(Experience of over forty years) 
J. H. EDWARDS, Proprietor 

TO EACH MEMBER OF M. H. S.. 1931 

BEST WISHES FOR ALL CLASS FUNCTIONS 
IN YOUR LAST YEAR AT HIGH SCHOOL, AND 
EVERY GOOD WISH FOR YOUR SUCCESS 
AND WELFARE IN THE YEARS TO COME. 

Lawrence Commercial School 

EDWARD D. McINTOSH, Principal 

316 Essex Street Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Telephone, 6965 

G. H. MALOOTIAN 

PRACTICAL CUSTOM TAILOR 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing, and Alterations 
294 BROADWAY 

Methuen, Mass. Telephone, 29693 

TAILORED TO MEASURE 
Let's tell you why ! Individually made to fit you. Hand-Tailored. 
The quality is remembered, long after the price is forgotten. 



George F. Wilson 



REQISTERED OPTOMETRIST 



210 ESSEX 
STREET 



LAWRENCE 
MASS. 



Com'plimenls of 

F. X. Robichand 

HARDWARE 

1 LOWELL STREET METHUEN 



Lawrence Rubber 
Company 

455 ESSEX STREET 
LAWRENCE 
MASS. 

KEDS 

The Best in Footwear 



Sporting Goods in All Lines 
including 

BASEBALL 
FOOTBALL 
BASKETBALL 
TENNIS 



E. M. RUSSELL 



METHUEN 



488-490 BROADWAY 
Dial 5215 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

Dr. F. H. Galloway 

— DENTIST — 



BAY STATE BLDG. 



LAWRENCE 



MASS. 



Tel. 7622 



New and Re-built 

TYPEWRITERS 

ALL MAKES ALL PRICES 

Special Rental Rates to Students 

The Typewriter Shop 

BAY STATE BLDG. LAWRENCE 
Phone 4702 



Compliments of 

EDWARD B. DOUGLAS 

Class of '10 
FUNERAL DIRECTOR 
7 Charles Street, Methuen, Mass. 

Dial 20842 

Compliments of 

ROY V. BAKETEL, M. D. 

Compliments of 

GANEM'S MARKET 

392 Essex Street 
Lawrence, Phone 
Mass. 23471 



IRVING H. TIRRELL 

NAN CABOT'S THOMPSON SPA'S 
CHOCOLATES 
Pound and half pound boxes 
Ice Cream Stationery 
Sodas, Magazines, Smokes 
Greeting Cards for all occasions 
Phone 30283 



W. STOEHRER 

REGISTERED 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 
59 East Haverhill Street 
Lawrence, . Massachusetts 



CANNON'S 

ADVANCED COURSES 

— for commercial high school graduates. 

COMPLETE BUSINESS COURSES 

— for normal and college course graduates. 



TRAINING IN— 
Shorthand 
Stenotype 
Secretaryship 



Civil Service 
Machine Calculation 
Machine Bookkeeping 



Bookkeeping 
Accounting 
Special Courses 



CANNON'S COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 



H. E. Petzold, Principal 



TOP FLOOR 



BAY STATE BUILDING 



You Have Tried the Rest 
Now Try the Best 

BRIGG'S MARKET 

quality for 31 years 
Meats, Groceries and Provisions 

We Recommend Monarch Brand 
Canned Foods 

Dial 27477 75 Centre Street 



0. J. STARKE & SON 



FOOD THAT MAKES MEAL SERV- 
ING A PLEASURE" 



53 Berkeley Street Dial 28444 



SAMEL'S STORES 

DISTINGUISHED CLOTHES 
FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

"get the best for less" 

512-514 ESSEX STREET LAWRENCE, MASS. 




HAVE YOUR CLOTHES 



INDIVIDUALLY TAILORED 



Prices from $22.50 to $50.00 



HARRY F. HARRIS 



Mmill Gaunt Square 



Drink Hill's Beverages 

Ginger Ale and ail other 
Flavors — Pure and 
Healthful 



Delivered at your Home 



Dial 22660 



HILL'S BEVERAGES 

Methuen, Mass. 



Compliments of 

Dr. H. D. CASWELL 
OPTOMETRIST 

AND EYESIGHT SPECIALIST 

Telephone 6783 
5 1 9 Essex Street Lawrence 

Frank W. Duncan 

DENTIST 



X-RAY DIAGNOSIS 



61 Lowell Street 



Tel. 30240 



LAWSON & SHAW 

WOOD and ICE 
80 Lowell Street 
Tel. 28563 
Methuen, Mass. 

THE NEIGHBORHOOD STORE 

Mrs. E. Tennant, Prop. 
80 Lowell Street 

HOME-COOKED MEATS 
A SPECIALTY 



Methuen, 



Massachusetts 



Rowell, Clay & Eastham 



Attorney s-at'Lau) 



BAY STATE BLDG. 



LAWRENCE 



HARPER METHOD 
CARE OF HAIR, SKIN, AND HANDS 

Misses Burtt and Dean 

528 Bay State Building 

L J. HYDE 

DENTIST 

234 Essex Street Lawrence 

Charles A, Clifford 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 

521 BAY STATE BLDG. 
LAWRENCE MASSACHUSETTS 

Coinpliinents of 

The Original 

Dye House 



Cross Book Shop 

Books, Qreeting Cards 
Circulating Library 

19 Lawrence Street 
BAY STATE BLDG. LAWRENCE 
Tel. 27853 



Compliments of 

Eaton &L Chandler 

ATTORNEYS'AT'LAW 

Bay State Bldg. 



LAWRENCE 



MASS. 



BROWN BROS. 



VINE MEATS and PROVISIONS 



Tel. 5113-5114 



METHUEN 



MASS. 



Compliments of 



Sweeney, Sargent 
& Sweeney 

ATTORNEYS'AT-LAW 



CENTRAL 
BUILDING 



LAWRENCE 
MASS. 





bddie s Market 




Edgar A. Turner, Prop. 


Swan &L Dobson 


Meats, Qroceries and Provisions 


— FLORISTS — 


83 Broadway 




Telephone 30029 


METHUEN MASS. 



Smith & Coutts Company 



Printers of School and 
College Publications 



4 Park Street 



Andover, Massachusetts